Herb-roasted turkey breast; corn bread dressing

Ina Garten; Better Homes and Gardens

Serves: 4-6

For the turkey:

  • 1 whole bone-in turkey breast, 6 1/2 to 7 pounds
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic (3 cloves)
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage leaves
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons good olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 cup dry white wine

For the dressing:

  • 1 recipe corn bread
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided; plus additional for buttering baking dish
  • 1  3/4 cups finely chopped celery (1/4 inch), with some tender inner leaves included
  • 1  3/4 cups finely chopped yellow onion (1/4 inch)
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon crumbled oven-dried Sage
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 5  1/2 cups hot chicken or turkey broth (additional, if needed)

For the turkey:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Place the turkey breast, skin side up, on a rack in a roasting pan.

In a small bowl, combine the garlic, mustard, herbs, salt, pepper, olive oil, and lemon juice to make a paste. Loosen the skin from the meat gently with your fingers and smear half of the paste directly on the meat. Spread the remaining paste evenly on the skin. Pour the wine into the bottom of the roasting pan.

Roast the turkey for 1 3/4 to 2 hours, until the skin is golden brown and an instant-read thermometer registers 165 degrees F when inserted into the thickest and meatiest areas of the breast. (I test in several places.) If the skin is over-browning, cover the breast loosely with aluminum foil. When the turkey is done, cover with foil and allow it to rest at room temperature for 15 minutes. Slice and serve with the pan juices spooned over the turkey.

For the dressing:

One day before making dressing, prepare Corn Bread recipe. Break corn bread in large pieces, spread on a tray, and let stand (uncovered) overnight to dry. (If unable to prepare corn bread the day before, spread pieces on a baking sheet and dry in a 200 degrees F oven for 30 minutes.)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large skillet over low heat, melt 5 tablespoons of the butter. Add chopped celery, onion, salt, and pepper. Cook for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring often, until vegetables are very tender and translucent, but not brown. (This step is essential in developing the flavor of the dish). Stir in crumbled sage; set aside to cool.

Crumble the dried cornbread in a large mixing bowl. (For fine texture dressing, crumble corn bread finely; for a rustic version, crumble larger pieces.)

Stir the celery and onion mixture into crumbled corn bread; stir in eggs. Stir in 3 cups of the broth. Melt the remaining 3 tablespoons of butter; stir in along with remaining broth. Mix well, adding more broth, if needed, to reach a soupy, pourable consistency.

Pour dressing mixture into a butter 3-quart baking dish. Bake on a center oven rack for 40 minutes. Increase oven temperature to 425 degrees F; bake 5 minutes longer, rotating dish if needed, until dressing is browned. Remove from oven to rack. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

*Chef’s note: Both were delicious, but I didn’t follow either recipe exactly. For the turkey, I mainly followed the temperature and timing; I rubbed a mixture of butter, rosemary and thyme on only the top of the skin, and it was still extremely flavorful and moist. Smells incredible! For the dressing, I used store-bought Whole Foods corn bread because I LOVE their sweet, moist, buttery variety. It didn’t get very dry, so I used much less chicken broth — use your judgment there. I also used thyme in place of sage. I had always wanted to try corn bread stuffing but never wanted to part with our tradition at Thanksgiving, so this was my time to experiment. It was so so good. Almost a bit too sweet, but this obviously depends on the type of corn bread you use as your base.

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